HEALTHY COMFORT FOODS - OCTOBER 2018 - VOLUME 10, ISSUE 7

 

Volume 10, Issue 7

October 2018

Healthy Comfort Foods

With the cooler weather, comfort foods look really attractive. Feeling stressed, sad or simply being tired can also make us want to turn to comfort foods. But are they healthy? A lot of our favourite comfort foods can be healthy with just a few subtle tweaks that won't reduce our enjoyment of them. Read on below...

These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better as it is a step towards longevity.

Ramila Padiachy

Doctor of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramila
 

Healthy Comfort Food Suggestions

The comfort foods that we enjoy so much in cooler weather tend to be heavy, high in fat and/or refined carbs, and sometimes they involve processed food. But they can be modified without losing flavour or reducing our satisfaction with them.

First, most fats aren't bad for us as we've been led to believe, certainly if consumed in moderation. The only fat to avoid totally is trans fat. Some vegetable oils have drawbacks, e.g. canola oil and soybean oil may be genetically modified and contain glyphosate. Many vegetable oils also contain high levels of omega-6 fatty acids. We need some omega-6, it's an essential fatty acid, meaning that the body does not produce it, and needs to obtain it from food. However, omega-6 causes inflammation, so we need to limit the amount we consume in relation to omega-3 to not more than a ratio of 2:1. Extra virgin olive oil and avocado oil are excellent choices. While you can still find a lot of negative 'information' about butter, there is an increasing amount of research demonstrating that it is healthy, preferably from grass-fed, organic sources.

declutter

Here are some healthy comfort food suggestions:


  • Grilled cheese tops the lists of many people. You can make it healthier by using organic whole grain bread, and you can even add roasted veggies.
  • Macaroni and cheese is another favourite. You can use organic whole wheat or brown rice macaroni. Also, avoid processed cheese in powder form and use real cheddar (as strong or mild as you like). Another suggestion is to add puréed butternut squash, pumpkin or cauliflower to your cheese sauce.
  • Pasta - for any pasta dish, you can use organic whole grain or brown rice pasta to create a healthier comfort meal. For lasagna, eggplant slices can also be used as a substitute for pasta.
  • Meatloaf can be made with ground turkey rather than beef (or a combination of the two) to decrease calories and fat. It can also include veggies so you use less meat, e.g. chopped mushrooms, celery and bell peppers. Substituting oatmeal for breadcrumbs increases the healthiness of meatloaf, as well.
  • Beef stew can be low-carb if you substitute turnips for potatoes - the texture is similar.
  • French fries can be baked with seasoning. For an even healthier snack, you can bake sweet potato fries.
  • Fried chicken can be baked to give you the same crunchy on the outside, juicy on the inside combination without the use of a deep fryer.
  • Mashed potatoes can be creamy if you use olive oil and broth rather than cream and butter. You can add cauliflower to further reduce calories and increase healthiness.
  • Homemade chicken soup actually is healthy and gives you the option of avoiding the excessive salt of store-bought versions. You can increase its healthiness by adding garlic to help prevent colds, as well as adding other healthy vegetables, such as sweet potatoes instead of noodles. 
  • Chocolate is healthy; it contains antioxidants. Stick to dark chocolate that's at least 70% cocoa for maximum benefits - milk chocolate is sweeter and contains much less cocoa.
  • Brownies can be healthy. You can find recipes on the web for various healthy versions of brownies, e.g. flour-free, low or no sugar, zucchini brownies - there is no end of variations that claim to be just as chocolaty and delicious as any less healthy version.
  • Are you craving ice cream? Coconut milk ice cream or almond milk ice cream are healthy substitutes.

As you can see, we're trying to avoid or reduce sugars and other refined carbohydrates, and in some cases, reduce the calories from fat, so you can apply these general principles to any other comfort food that appeals to you.

If all else fails and nothing but the 'real' comfort food will do, don't feel guilty for an occasional lapse. Tomorrow is another day!

 

References


  1. Link R. 11 best healthy fats for your body. draxe.com/healthy-fats/ July 25, 2018. Accessed September 26, 2018.
  2. Steinhilber B. Why we crave comfort foods - and how to make them healthier. nbcnews.com/better/health/why-we-crave-comfort-foods-how-make-them-healthier-ncna840016 January 24, 2018. Accessed September 25, 2018.
  3. Fischer K. 10 tips for healthy comfort foods. eatthis.com/healthy-comfort-foods/ September 16, 2016. Accessed September 16, 2018.
  4. Healthy comfort food recipes. eatingwell.com/recipes/19699/cooking-methods-styles/comfort/ Accessed September 16, 2018. 
  5. Glassman K. 5 comfort foods that are actually really good for you. today.com/health/5-comfort-foods-are-actually-really-good-you-t119907 December 11, 2017. Accessed September 25, 2018.

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

Supplements

There are some Nature's Sunshine supplements that would help you to maximize your health now that summer is over. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Colostrum
  • Super Vitamins & Minerals
  • Vitamin D3
  • Zambroza
Milk Thistle

For additional information, please email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Also, on our website, please see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products and our clinic, and order products.

Ramila created a nutritional plan for me. She also taught me how to balance out my nutritional needs and what kinds of food eat and to avoid. I started seeing major differences in my body and overall health in just 3 weeks. I had more energy, my headaches were fewer to none, and my feet and joints didn’t hurt as much. I stuck to the health plan and went from a size 15 to now a size 9. I have lost 40 lbs. -RG

The Belly of the Beast

AVAILABLE NOW

thebellyofthebeast.ca

1437 Woodroffe Avenue

Ottawa ON (map)

Facebook info@ramilas.comWebsite

ALL ABOUT PROBIOTICS - SEPTEMBER 2016 - VOLUME 8 ISSUE 6

 

 

Ramilas Health Tips

Ramila's Healing Arts Clinic

 

There's been quite a lot of recent news about the importance of digestive health in relation to other seemingly unrelated aspects of health, such as emotional health and cognitive function. I thought it would be helpful to look at the role of probiotics and how they affect our overall health.
 
These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better. It is a step toward longevity.

clinic

Volume 8, Issue 6

Ramila Padiachy

Doctorate of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic

1437 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa ON (map)

613.829.0427
info@ramilas.com

Like us on Facebook

What are Probiotics?

Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts that are good for your health, especially your digestive system. The word probiotics comes from pro biota, which means "for life". Although people tend to think of bacteria and other microorganisms as harmful "germs", many microorganisms help our bodies function properly. For example, bacteria that are normally present in our intestines help digest food, destroy disease-causing microorganisms (e.g., E. coli, some yeasts, other unfriendly microbes), and produce vitamins. Many of the microorganisms in probiotic products are the same as or similar to microorganisms that naturally live in our bodies.
 
What is in probiotics? The most common are bacteria that belong to groups called Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. These are broad groups that include many types of bacteria. Lactobacillus may be the most common probiotic, and is found in yogurt and other fermented foods. Bifidobacterium can also be found in some dairy products.
 
What are prebiotics and synbiotics? Prebiotics are dietary substances that favour the growth of beneficial bacteria over harmful ones. Synbiotics are products that combine probiotics and prebiotics.

Do you need probiotics?

stomach troublesThe health of the intestinal tract is largely dependent on maintaining a healthy balance of friendly microorganisms, or friendly flora. Several factors can kill these friendly microbes which can cause us to develop chronic yeast overgrowth, compromising both bowel health and general immune resistance.
 
Probiotic supplements replace friendly microbes. Standard recommendations for taking probiotics include:
  • after taking any antibiotics
  • when travelling, to help protect the body against infections from drinking water and food
  • for anyone suffering from yeast or fungal infections, or for people with chronic sinus problems, weak immunity, or other chronic infections
  • if you are exposed to chlorinated or fluoridated water, especially in a hot shower, which is worse than drinking it
  • if you use antibacterial soap
  • if you eat conventionally-raised meats and other animal products, since such animals are routinely fed low-dose antibiotics, plus genetically engineered grains which have also been implicated in the destruction of gut flora
  • if you consume processed foods (excessive sugars, plus otherwise "dead" nutrients feed pathogenic (bad) bacteria)
  • if you're exposed to agricultural chemicals

How to help your gut flora

In addition to avoiding as many of the harmful factors as possible, eat fermented foods (traditionally made, unpasteurized) such as kefir, various pickles, lassi (an Indian yogurt drink), and natto (fermented soy). If you don't eat fermented foods regularly, take a good quality probiotic.
 
Gut bacteria affect brain functioning and mental health
 
We all know that our mental state can affect our digestive system. For example, stress and other emotions can contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms such as butterflies in our stomachs. However, recent research has linked the health of gut flora to brain functioning and mental health - this means the gut-brain connection is a two-way street.
 
We tend to think the brain is in charge. However, you may have also heard of "the second brain" in the gut. There are two nervous systems: the central nervous system and the enteric nervous system. They are connected by the vagus nerve, the tenth cranial nerve that runs from the brain stem down to the abdomen. This is the route the gut bacteria use to transmit information to the brain.  
 
Just as you have neurons in your brain, you also have neurons in your gut, including neurons that produce neurotransmitters like serotonin, which is also found in your brain. It is reported that the greatest concentration of serotonin (related to mood control, depression, and aggression) is found in your intestines, not your brain. This may be one reason why antidepressants, which raise serotonin levels in your brain are often ineffective in treating depression, whereas proper dietary changes often help.
 
Emotional shifts experienced by people with irritable bowel syndrome, as well as other bowel problems, such as diarrhea and constipation, may be triggered by the enteric nervous system, rather than the other way around. Historically, it was believed that anxiety and depression contributed to these bowel problems but now researchers are see that the connection may also be the other way around.
 
Digestive system activity may also affect cognition - thinking skills and memory.  When the composition of the microorganisms in the gut is not ideal, it can promote inflammation which, in turn, can result in cognitive decline. In fact, inflammation is linked with many major diseases (cardiovascular disease and cancer, as well as dementia) which underscores the importance of a well-balanced digestive system.
 
It's hard to do justice to such a large topic in a short newsletter. For more comprehensive information about the extent to which we share our bodies with microbial species, I recommend this article published in the New York Times. I hope you are convinced of the huge importance of keeping your gut healthy, both through good nutrition and well-balanced probiotics.

Supplements for Maintaining a Healthy Gut

Bifidophilus Flora Force

There are some Nature's Sunshine supplements that are very helpful for maintaining a healthy gut.

 

You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Bifidophilus Flora Force
  • NutriBiome Bacillus Coagulans Probiotics
  • Probiotic 11

For additional information, please email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Visit our website where you can see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products, and our clinic, and order products.

 

References:

  1. DiLonardo MJ. What are probiotics? WebMD Feature webmd.com/digestive-disorders/features/what-are-probiotics  Accessed September 19, 2016.
  2. Probiotics. National Center for Complementary Health, NIH. nccih.nih.gov/health/probiotics/introduction.htm  Accessed September 19, 2016.
  3. Horne S. Do you need probiotics? Tree of Light Publishing (treelite.com). Obtained through Nature's Sunshine Products.
  4. Mercola J. Mental health may depend on the health of your gut flora. articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/11/12/mental-health-gut-flora.aspx  November 12, 2015.
  5. Mercola J. Your gut bacteria affects your brain function, the study confirms. articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/06/20/gut-brain-connection.aspx  June 20, 2013.
  6. The brain-gut connection. hopkinsmedicine.org/health/healthy_aging/healthy_body/the-brain-gut-connection  Accessed September 19, 2016.
  7. Caracciolo B, Xu W. Collins S, Fratiglioni L. Cognitive decline, dietary factors and gut-brain interactions. Mechanisms of Ageing and Development 2014;136-137:59-69.
  8. Pollan M. Some of my best friends are germs. New York Times, May 15, 2013, nytimes.com/2013/05/19/magazine/say-hello-to-the-100-trillion-bacteria-that-make-up-your-microbiome.html
 

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

When health begins, dis-ease ends.

Thanks again to you and Ramila for the treatment. The pain in my arms and shoulders is completely gone and I had pizza yesterday for the first time since I went off dairy last September. WOW!
- Garry F, Toronto

SIMPLE, HEALTHY, DELICIOUS SUMMER TREATS – JULY 2016 – VOLUME 8 ISSUE 4

 

 

Ramilas Health Tips

Ramila's Healing Arts Clinic

 

With all the fresh fruits and vegetables coming into the market at this time of year, I want to focus on some simple, healthy summer treats this month. While I've designed them with kids in mind, I'm sure you'll agree that adults will enjoy them just as much. This newsletter is based largely on a recent interview I did with CTV Morning Live.


These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better. It is a step toward longevity.

clinic

Volume 8, Issue 4

Ramila Padiachy

Doctorate of Natural Medicine (DNM)®

Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic

1437 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa ON (map)

613.829.0427
info@ramilas.com

Like us on Facebook

Simple, Healthy, Delicious Summer Treats - Enjoy!

My main feature is popsicles - four different kinds. The first (see recipes below) features 3 colourful layers, with no food dyes - the bottom layer (you actually add the layers in the opposite order when you're making this) of mangos, then strawberries, and kiwi on top. All fruits are blended and added individually after freezing the previous layer for 15-30 minutes. As well as using a standard popsicle shape, these can also be made in the shape of a cup cake.  
 
There are also recipes (below) for creamsicles, yogurt popsicles and blueberry freezies.
 
In addition, I've provided you with recipes for two types of ice cream, suggestions for fruit skewers and a chocolate pudding that makes an excellent dip for the fruit skewers. The pudding contains avocado, so it is rich in protein, and no one would suspect it was there. This pudding is the only one with a little sweetener added - maple syrup - and none of the other recipes contain any added sugar or other sweetener.
 

Avoid Sugars, Dyes and Other Food Additives

This topic is huge and here we can only scratch the surface, however, here are some basic tips.
 
What is a food additive? Food additives are substances added to food to preserve flavour or enhance its taste and appearance. Sugars and dyes are probably the most common types of additive.
 
Why you should avoid added sugars:
  • Added sugar contains no essential nutrients and is bad for your teeth.
  • Added sugar, and especially HFCS (high fructose corn syrup), is high in fructose which can overload your liver. If you eat too much fructose (and especially if you are sedentary and eat a lot of processed foods), the liver will convert it into fat.
  • Overloading the liver with fructose can cause non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). People with NAFLD consume 2 to 3 times as much fructose as the average person.
  • Sugar can cause insulin resistance, which is a stepping stone toward metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.
  • Sugar is a leading cause of obesity in both children and adults. In turn, obesity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and several types of cancer, and other diseases and disabilities.
  • It's not the fat in your diet, it's the sugar, or more specifically the fructose, that raises your cholesterol (small, dense LDL and oxidized LDL), and triglyceride levels which can lead to heart disease.
The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends restricting added sugars to 5% of our dietary intake.  For the average person, this would be about 6 teaspoons (30 ml) of sugar per day - that's less than the amount in one can of sugar sweetened soft drink. While WHO concedes that 5% might be unrealistic for many people, they emphasize that the dietary intake of sugar definitely should not exceed 10%.
 
Food dyes
 
Food dyes are one of the most widely used and dangerous additives. There are many different food dyes with different risks, however the main points can be summarized:
  • Several food dyes increase the risk of different types of cancer in laboratory animals.
  • Some dyes are known carcinogens; for others, more research is needed but why take the risk?
  • The other major area of concern is hyperactivity and other behavioural effects, particularly in children.
  • Dyes are also linked to sensitivities and to asthma, among others.
Detailed information is available in the CSPI's (Center for Science in the Public Interest) Food Dyes: A Rainbow of Risks (pdf).
 
There are many other additives, but this covers a major proportion of most peoples' exposure. In general, food additives are best avoided.
 
I hope you enjoy the recipes below, and that you're having a great summer!
 

Recipes

POPSICLES
 
1. Fruit Pops
  • blend kiwi and pour into popsicle mould 1/3 way up, freeze for 15 to 30 minutes
  • blend strawberries and fill 1/3 way up freeze again
  • blend mango and fill final 1/3 of mould
  • freeze and enjoy
2. Creamsicles
  • mix 1 scoop TNT formula (available at our clinic) in 60ml of water and 60 ml of pure mango juice
  • pour into popsicle mould
  • freeze and enjoy
3.  Frozen yogurt pops
  • mix 2 scoops of the TNT formula with 60 ml of coconut milk and 60 ml of Greek yogurt, shake to combine
  • pour into popsicle mould
  • freeze and enjoy
4. Blueberry freezies
  • pour coconut water into mould and drop in a few blueberries
  • freeze and enjoy
 
ICE CREAMS
 
Choco-banana ice cream
  • 2 frozen bananas 
  • 1 cup coconut milk 
  • 2 tsp coconut oil 
  • 2 tsp vanilla 
  • 2 tbsp raw cocoa powder 
Optional: 1/2 cup of Greek yogurt
Blend together, freeze and enjoy.
 
Piña Colada ice cream
  • 2 cups frozen pineapple
  • 1 cup coconut milk 
  • 4 tbsp shredded coconut 
Optional: 1 scoop protein powder (Nature's Harvest works well and is available at our clinic)
Blend together, freeze and enjoy.
 
PUDDING
 
Chocolate avocado pudding
  • 1 medium avocado
  • 1/2 cup almond or coconut milk 
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup 
  • 1 tbsp raw cocoa powder 
  • pinch of salt
  • pinch of cinnamon 

Blend together, chill and enjoy.
 
FRUIT SKEWERS
  • fruit of your choice cut into equal sized pieces to fit on bamboo skewers evenly 
  • the chocolate avocado pudding makes a great dip for these

Supplements for Success

Nature's Harvest

There are a couple of Nature's Sunshine products that you can use in these recipes. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • TNT
  • Nature's Harvest
 

For additional information, please email info@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Visit our website where you can see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products and our clinic, and order products.

 

References:

  1. Food additive. Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_additive Accessed July 5, 2016.
  2. Gunnars K. 10 disturbing reasons why sugar is bad for you. authoritynutrition.com/10-disturbing-reasons-why-sugar-is-bad/ September 2013. Accessed July 4, 2016.
  3. Branswell H. Eating sugar causes massive health problems, says WHO. The Canadian Press. huffingtonpost.ca/2014/03/05/eating-sugar_n_4903790.html Accessed July 4, 2016.
  4. Mercola J. Are you or your family eating toxic food dyes? February 24, 2011. articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/02/24/are-you-or-your-family-eating-toxic-food-dyes.aspx Accessed July 4, 2016. 
  5. Kobylewski S, Jacobson ME. Food Dyes: A Rainbow of Risks. Washington, DC: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 2010. cspinet.org/new/pdf/food-dyes-rainbow-of-risks.pdf
 

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

 

After several years of searching for relief, a friend has recommended I see Ramila. I suffered from debilitating environmental and food allergies, and such fatigue that walking up a flight of stairs was difficult. Within a few minutes of my first visit I knew I was in good hands with Ramila, as she had the uncanny ability to understand my problem and therefore get to the root of my illness.
 
For my path to wellness, Ramila had suggested sensitivity clearing for my allergies, as well as herbal supplements. I also gained tremendous relief from her emotional release technique. After each treatment I felt a huge weight lifted from my shoulders, I would never have believed how your emotions could play such a pivotal role in your physical well-being. Today I am happy to report health, wellness and serenity that I never thought possible.
 
- A.J., Ottawa, ON

When health begins, dis-ease ends.

Healthy Summer Treats

Why buy processed, sugar filled treats for your kids when you can have fun in the kitchen together making homemade healthy versions. 

Here are the recipes for the treats Ramila talked about today June 27, 2016 on Ottawa CTV Morning Live

Healthy Summer Treat Recipes

- all homemade, without preservatives, or food colourings.

 

POPSICLES

1. FRUIT POPS
- blend kiwi and pour into popsicle mould 1/3 way up, freeze for 30mins, 
- then blend strawberries and fill 1/3 way up freeze again, 
- then blend mango and fill final 1/3 of mould. Freeze and enjoy

2. CREAMSICLE
- mix 1 scoop TNT formula (available at our clinic) in 60ml of water and 60 ml of pure mango juice. 
- pour into popsicle mould, freeze and enjoy

3.  FROZEN YOGURT POP
- mix 2 scoop of the TNT formula, with 60 ml of coconut milk and 60 ml of yogurt, shake to combine
- pour into popsicle mould, freeze and enjoy

4. BLUEBERRY FREEZY
- pour coconut water into mould and drop in a few blueberries, freeze and enjoy  

ICE CREAMS

1. CHOCO-BANANA ICE CREAM
- 2 frozen bananas
- 1 cup coconut milk
- 2 tsp coconut oil
- 2 tsp vanilla
- 2 tbsp raw cocoa powder
Optional: 1/2 cup of greek yogurt

Blend together, freeze and enjoy

2. PINA COLADA ICE CREAM
- 2 cups frozen pineapple
- 1 cup coconut milk
- 4 tbsp shredded coconut
Optional: 1 scoop protein powder

PUDDING

1. CHOCOLATE AVOCADO PUDDING
- 1 medium avocado
- 1/2 cup almond or coconut milk
- 1 tbsp maple syrup
- 1 tbsp raw cocoa powder
- pinch of salt
- pinch of cinnamon
- blend together, chill and enjoy 

FRUIT SKEWERS

- fruit of choice to make skewers, cut into equal sized pieces to fit on bamboo skewers evenly
- can use the chocolate avocado pudding as a dip for these

HOW YOU CAN HELP YOUR DIGESTIVE SYSTEM - JANUARY 2016 - VOLUME 7, ISSUE 10

Ramilas Health Tips

Ramila's Healing Arts Clinic

Happy New Year! I hope you had a wonderful holiday season. In case you enjoyed all the great food that goes with the season just a little bit more than you intended, I thought it would be helpful to focus this month on some simple, natural ways we can help out our digestive system and liver (the liver is part of the digestive system but I think it deserves to be looked at separately). You'll see that simply including certain foods in your diet can be really beneficial to both the liver and the rest of the digestive system. This can include formal cleansing but it certainly doesn't have to. Find out more below...

 

These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better. It is a step toward longevity.

new location

Volume 7, Issue 10

Ramila Padiachy

Doctorate of Natural Medicine (DNM)® R.Ac.

 

Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic

1437 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa ON (map)

613.829.0427
info@ramilas.com

Like us on Facebook

 

 

 

How You Can Help Your Digestive System

Fibrous fruits and vegetables are among the most effective foods for cleaning out your digestive system. They don't just clean, they can also curb your appetite and make it a lot easier to cut down or cut out high calorie foods, and give your digestive system a chance to function optimally.
 
The top detoxifying vegetables are broccoli, broccoli sprouts, spinach, kale, asparagus, bok choy, watercress, radish, cauliflower, artichoke, garlic. Mung beans are extremely easy to digest, and absorb toxic residue from the intestinal wall. The best fruits are avocado, tomato, watermelon, guava, berries, lemons, oranges and limes.


ginger teaSeeds and nuts are recommended, including flax seed, pumpkin seeds, almonds, walnuts, hemp seeds, sesame seeds, chia, and sunflower seeds.

Herbs and spices - You can steep herbs in water to make teas, and include spices in your cooking. Fennel can reduce bloating, gas and heartburn, while ginger is an effective anti-inflammatory. Ginseng boosts immunity and helps the body deal with stress. Mint soothes your digestive system and nutmeg helps restore regular bowel activity. Turmeric (or curcumin) helps cleanse your liver and boost your immunity.

Fermented foods are gaining recognition for their benefit to gut health, immunity and the elimination of damaging bacteria. They improve uptake of nutrients from other food, and improve digestion of foods you may have difficulty with including high fibre foods. Good options include yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, pickled vegetables and miso. Probiotics are also very helpful (See Supplements section).

Avoid refined carbohydrates including food containing sugar and refined flour. Avoid processed foods.

Drink plenty of water. The more hydrated you are, the fewer toxins will stay circulating in your body. Water is always important, whether or not you're making additional efforts to cleanse. It reduces hunger, improves digestion, improves bowel function, increases immunity and improves your metabolism. Water and herbal tea are the beverages of choice for detoxing. Eight, 8 ounce glasses is the minimum you need. As I've mentioned before, divide your weight in pounds by 2, and that's the number of ounces you should drink to a maximum of 100 oz.

Catch up on sleep. Seven to 8 hours of good quality sleep a night is necessary for the other efforts you're making to be of maximum benefit.

Be physically active! Nothing works as well in a sedentary person - to get the most out of any other measures you incorporate, you need to be physically active.  Physical activity is very important for weight control and bowel health. Please see our newsletter of July 2015.

Learn to manage your stress. Stress results in the release of hormones that increase inflammation, which can interfere with all your other efforts. Meditation can be very beneficial. For more information, see our newsletter of March 2013.

Avoid obvious environmental toxins. Don't tolerate second hand smoke. Avoid polluted air as much as you can. Eat organic foods whenever possible. Avoid foods that are commonly genetically modified unless they are specified as organic, including canola oil, soy and corn.

 

How to Help Your Liver

The liver is our personal detoxification system, or vacuum cleaner, but sometimes it can use some help, especially if we've been causing it to work harder than usual over the holidays. Think of liver detoxification as an 'oil change' - your car needs fresh oil to function well, and your liver needs some care too.


The liver supports weight loss because it helps to create and process enzymes called lipase that digest fats. When we eat poorly, the liver makes more fat to store the toxins and keeps us overweight.


The liver also:

  • stores vitamins and iron
  • converts stored sugar to usable sugar when the body's sugar levels fall below normal
  • produces bile which is needed to digest fats
  • breaks down hemoglobin as well as insulin and other hormones
  • destroys old red blood cells.

Probably the leading health risk to the liver is the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) from consuming too much sugar. It's definitely more common than fatty liver disease due to alcohol consumption.

Much of what we've already seen is good - and bad - for the digestive system is also good or bad for the liver.

vegetablesFoods that cleanse the liver include: garlic; onions; beets; carrots; leafy green vegetables; cruciferous vegetables including cabbage and Brussels sprouts; tomatoes; avocados; apples; alternative grains such as quinoa, millet and buckwheat; green tea; citrus fruits including grapefruit, lemons and limes; walnuts; artichoke; asparagus; kale; collard greens; sesame seeds; flax seeds; fennel; ginger; basil; parsley; beans; dandelion; fish oil; olive oil; and, perhaps surprisingly, eggs. It is hypothesized that the healthy cholesterol in eggs (contrary to what we've been taught for many years) may result in the liver producing less.

You can see that green foods are highly recommended, and chlorophyll rids the body of harmful environmental toxins from toxic metals, herbicides, cleaning products, and pesticides. It also aids the liver in detoxification.  

If, in addition to incorporating some of these dietary recommendations, you are interested in doing a full cleanse, please contact me for help. While I believe cleanses are very beneficial when done properly, they can be dangerous if done incorrectly. So please contact me to ensure you do not run unnecessary risks, at 613-829-0427.

 

Supplements

Milk ThistleThere are a number of Nature's Sunshine supplements that can help with digestive and liver health. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Acidophilus-bifidobacterium
  • Bifidophilus Flora Force
  • Milk Thistle
  • Digestive Enzymes
  • Garden Essence
  • YF DTX
  • Heavy Metal Detox
  • TIAO HE PAK
  • CleanStart® Wild Berry
  • Body Detox
  • Chlorophyll - liquid or capsules
  • CurcuminBP

For additional information, please email ramila@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Also, on our website, please see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products and our clinic, and order products.

References:

  1. Hanly L. Safe natural ways to detox your digestive system. http://www.livestrong.com/article/112033-safe-natural-detox-digestive-system/ Updated June 12, 2015, accessed January 11, 2016.
  2. 28 simple and natural ways to detox your body. http://bembu.com/natural-ways-to-detox-your-body  Accessed January 2016.
  3. Group E. 10 foods that detox the body. http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/foods-that-detox-the-body/  Updated May 5, 2014.
  4. Walia A. 19 super foods that naturally cleanse your liver. http://www.collective-evolution.com/2014/07/06/19-super-foods-that-naturally-cleanse-your-liver/ July 6, 2014.
  5. Patel A. Foods for liver: 20 detoxing things to cook with this year. Huffington Post Canada http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/12/31/foods-for-liver-_n_4524277.html Updated January 21, 2014.
  6. Sarich C. Liver cleanse diet: 11 ways to support the body's fat and toxin processing wonder. http://naturalsociety.com/11-foods-support-liver-cleanse-diet-detox-toxins/ July 1, 2013.  
  7. Group E. 14 foods that cleanse the liver. http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/liver-cleanse-foods/ Updated on October 5, 2015.

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

 

Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.

Ramila has the gift for curing. After only two visits, an ailment I had suffered with for years has been cured. She has gained my respect as a powerful healer. Thank you Ramila, for sharing your gifts. I am grateful to have you on my path.

- Anonymous

 

When health begins, dis-ease ends.

WHY ARE YOU EATING? - DECEMBER 2015 - VOLUME 7 ISSUE 9

 

Ramilas Health Tips

Ramila's Healing Arts Clinic

Once again, the holiday season is here, so I thought it would be a good idea to look at what happens when we succumb to emotional eating. That way, if we can see it coming, we can be proactive in stopping ourselves - we can be mindful - before we eat way more than we really want, or the 'wrong things' for the wrong reasons. Find out more below...

 

Best Wishes for a happy, healthy, stress-free holiday season and a wonderful New Year from Megs, Chanele, Tamia and myself.

- Ramila

 

These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better. It is a step toward longevity.

new location

Volume 7, Issue 9

Ramila Padiachy

Doctorate of Natural Medicine (DNM)® R.Ac.

 

Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic

1437 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa ON (map)

613.829.0427
info@ramilas.com

Like us on Facebook

 

Why are You Eating?

Is your hunger emotional or physical?

  • Emotional hunger occurs in response to your feelings.
  • Physical hunger occurs because your body needs fuel.
  • Emotional hunger tends to come on suddenly.
  • Physical hunger emerges gradually.
  • With emotional hunger, you crave certain foods.
  • With physical hunger, you're open to many options.
  • Emotional hunger doesn't notice signs of fullness.
  • With physical hunger, you stop eating when you're full.


What does your body really need when you have food cravings?


You might be interested in watching a short video of an interview I did recently on CTV. The information is included in the following table.

 

*Note: Dark chocolate, in moderation, is healthy!
+Plus a supplement.

 

Specific Traps to Avoid

Sugar: Not so good in your stomach, even worse in your bloodstream


sugarUnder normal conditions, when blood sugar levels rise after eating, the pancreas secretes insulin that allows the cells to take in and use glucose (sugar) for energy. When cells become resistant, they don't respond to insulin. The excess glucose builds in the bloodstream and is eventually stored as fat. This triggers carbohydrate cravings and fatigue because the cells are literally starving for the fuel and energy they need to function. Giving in to carbohydrate cravings results in weight gain, and the vicious cycle continues.


Insulin resistance, one of the main components of metabolic syndrome, is clearly on the rise. Why is this? Our early ancestors obtained whole foods from the environment and expended a lot of physical energy to do so. Today most of us consume processed foods laden with sweeteners, and we lack the physical activity our bodies need.


Good news! Insulin resistance can be prevented and reversed through diet and exercise. The Diabetes Prevention Program and other large studies have shown that people with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes can make improvements by losing just 5–7% of their body weight and walking 30 minutes daily.


Note that it's really important to avoid soft drinks and foods containing high fructose corn syrup (HFCS).


Other refined carbohydrates are close cousins of sugar and should be avoided for the same reasons, e.g. anything made of refined white flour.


Artificial sweeteners

 

Studies have shown that most artificial sweeteners, believe it or not, cause weight gain and obesity. So opting for the low-cal version of your favourite soft drink won't do you any favours. In particular, avoid saccharin, aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame K, and neotame. Exceptions are xylitol and stevia which are great natural alternatives. A word of caution if you have a pet: xylitol is extremely poisonous to dogs and cats, so don't let them eat anything with xylitol in it.

 

Water, Fruit and Vegetables

We need water!


cucumber in waterWhether or not weight loss is part of your plan, you need lots of good quality water. If you do intend to lose weight, water is considered by many to be a major ingredient for success. It helps you feel full. It cleanses. It heals. And it has numerous other health benefits.


To review, you should drink half an ounce of water for each pound you weigh (up to a maximum of 100 ounces). For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, you should drink 75 ounces of water per day.


There are lots of things you can do to make drinking water more interesting. While most other drinks do not count as substitutes for water, one exception is herbal tea – this gives you all sorts of tasty options. Another way to add variety is to add a couple of slices of cucumber to your water pitcher or container for the day. For variety, you can add a thin slice of orange, lemon or lime; or a sliced strawberry; a small piece of watermelon or cantaloupe. Liquid chlorophyll (see supplements below) is another great addition with its refreshing spearmint flavour.

Vegetables and fruit


As always, vegetables are an excellent choice, as well as fruit in moderation because it's sweeter. Consider the space taken in your stomach by 400 calories:

  1. by oil – it just covers the bottom of your stomach.
  2. by chicken – a few small pieces don't come close to filling your stomach.
  3. by vegetables – your entire stomach is full!

We recommend aiming for at least 5 servings of vegetables each day.

 

Manage Stress

We've covered stress management in previous newsletters (June 2014 and March 2013), but to briefly review a few basics:

  • Be physically active. Try to get 30 minutes (or at least 20 minutes if you can't manage 30) of exercise at least as vigorous as walking briskly every day.
  • Get enough good quality sleep. At least 7 hours a night is very important for managing stress and also for controlling your appetite. It's almost impossible not to eat more (especially carbs) when you're really tired.
  • Use relaxation techniques. There are many different ones, some of which were outlined in the June 2014 newsletter. Find what works for you and practice your favourite techniques regularly.

 

Supplements

ZerenityThere are a number of Nature's Sunshine supplements that can help manage stress and emotional eating. You can find information about these products and purchase them in our online store:

  • Magnesium Complex
  • Vitamin B Complex
  • Calcium
  • Omega-3
  • Liquid Chlorophyl
  • Zerenity


If your New Year's resolutions include weight loss with an emphasis on healthy eating, please see our website for information about the weight loss program at our clinic.

For additional information, please email ramila@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Also, on our website, please see back issues of this newsletter, information about services, products and our clinic, and order products.

References:

  1. What do my cravings say about me? Module 6 in the IN.FORM Participant manual. 2014 Nature's Sunshine Products of Canada Ltd. www.naturessunshine.com

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

 

Featured Service

Emotional release therapy is an alternative healing method used to help release a person's negative energy. This technique is widely used in grief therapy and in other areas of emotional trauma. It is also successful in healing both physical and emotional wounds.

Emotional releasing techniques require a person to discover what past hurts and emotions are currently causing mental or physical pain. Once these hurts are discovered they can be released, eventually alleviating the problem and filling the person with positive energy.


Click here to learn more.

Ramila is truly a gifted healer. I left her office with the most amazing feeling that cannot be fully described in words. What I like most about the Emotional Release Technique was the fact that I didn't have to open up and share my feelings. While I am an open and outgoing person, I tend to keep my personal feelings very guarded. In the past I have tried therapy but speaking about my emotions was very uncomfortable for me.

- Delanie, Montreal, QC

 

When health begins, dis-ease ends.

 

MINDFUL EATING - SEPTEMBER 2015 - VOLUME 7 ISSUE 6

Ramila's Health Tips

Ramila's Healing Arts Clinic

Mindfulness is an increasingly popular concept we discussed last month and, as promised, this month I'll cover mindful eating. Why is this important? Research shows that distractions while we eat prevent us from enjoying what we're eating. Called 'mindless eating', this seemingly innocent behaviour has been linked with overeating, stress and anxiety. Find out more below...

 

These newsletters will help you make better choices for better health. The choices that you make today can either have a positive or negative impact on your overall health. Begin by choosing better. It is a step toward longevity.

new location

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Volume 7, Issue 6

Ramila Padiachy

Doctorate of Natural Medicine (DNM)® R.Ac.

 

Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic

1437 Woodroffe Avenue
Ottawa ON (map)

613.829.0427
info@ramilas.com

Like us on Facebook

 

 

 

 

Mindful Eating

You've been working hard at the computer, and it's time for a treat. You promised yourself... let's say, a piece of delicious dark chocolate. You take a bite - mmmm, fantastic. You take a second bite - still good, but maybe not quite as wonderful as the first bite. An email catches your attention, which results in you watching a brief video. All of a sudden, or so it seems, your chocolate is gone! How did that happen?! Clearly not an example of mindful eating!

First, here is a brief review of the principles of mindfulness:

  • Mindfulness is deliberately paying attention, non-judgmentally.
  • Mindfulness encompasses both internal processes and external environments.
  • Mindfulness is being aware of what is present for you mentally, emotionally and physically in each moment.
  • With practice, mindfulness cultivates the possibility of freeing yourself of reactive, habitual patterns of thinking, feeling and acting.
  • Mindfulness promotes balance, choice, wisdom and acceptance of what is.

Mindful eating is:

  • allowing yourself to become aware of the positive and nurturing opportunities that are available through food preparation and consumption by respecting your own inner wisdom
  • choosing to eat food that is both pleasing to you and nourishing to your body by using all your senses to explore, savour and taste
  • paying full attention to the experience of eating and drinking, both inside and outside the body, including the colours, smells, textures, flavours, temperatures, and even the sounds (e.g. crunch) of your food
  • acknowledging responses to food (like, neutral, dislike) without judgment
  • learning to be aware of physical hunger and satiety cues to guide your decision to begin eating and to stop eating
  • while avoiding judgment or criticism, watching when the mind gets distracted, pulling away from full attention to what you are eating or drinking (For example, watch impulses to grab a book, turn on the TV, catch up with Facebook, or do a web search on some interesting topic. What you need to do is notice the impulse and then return to just eating.)
  • noticing how eating affects your mood and how emotions, like anxiety, influence your eating

Our habits of eating and not paying attention are not easy to change. Lasting change takes time and needs to be done slowly, one small change at a time.

 

Mindful Eating Tips

  1. healthy breakfastShift out of autopilot eating
    What did you eat for breakfast? Many people eat the same thing day in and day out. Notice whether you are stuck in a rut or routine.
  2. Take mindful bites
    Did you ever eat an entire plate of food and not taste one single bite? Bring all of your senses to the dinner table. Notice the aroma of freshly baked bread. Notice the texture of yogurt on your tongue. Taste your meal. Experience each bite from start to finish.
  3. Attentive eating
    If you get the urge to have a snack while you're working or studying, stop and take a break so that you can pay total attention to eating. Avoid multitasking while you eat. Just eat and do nothing else at the same time.
  4. Mindfully check in
    Ask yourself, "How hungry am I on a scale of 1 to 10?" Each time you eat, ask yourself, "Am I physically hungry?" Plan to eat until your are satisfied, and neither stuffed nor starving.
  5. Think mindfully
    Observe negative thoughts about eating, like, "I'm so stupid, how could I have eaten that?" Negative thoughts can trigger overeating, or stop you from adequately feeding your hunger. Remember that a thought is just a thought and not a fact.
  6. Mindful speech
    Chatting about dieting and fat is so common we are often not aware of it and the impact it can have on our self-esteem. Keep in mind how comments like, "I'm so fat," or the "I'm fat; no you're not" debate, can affect someone struggling with food issues.
  7. Mindful eating support
    Friends and family can provide a lot of support, but often it's helpful to obtain assistance from a trained professional. Be aware that family and friends may feel uncomfortable about you making changes. They may sometimes even attempt to sabotage your efforts (to increase their comfort levels, not because they don't wish you well) - be on the lookout for this. I'd be pleased to offer advice.

 

Mindful Eating Exercises

Try choosing at least one of these exercises to help you practice mindful eating:

  1. Take the first 4 sips of a cup of hot tea or coffee with full attention.
  2. If you are reading and eating, alternate these activities instead of doing them both at once. Read a page, then put the book down and eat a few bites, savouring the tastes, then read another page, and so on.
  3. At family meals ask everyone to eat in silence for the first 5 minutes, thinking about the many people who brought the food to your table.
  4. Eat one meal a week mindfully, alone and in silence. Be creative. For example, could you eat lunch behind a closed office door, or even alone in your car?

 

Things to do instead of Mindless Eating

readingTo stop mindless eating, try an alternate activity to distract yourself:

  • Turn on your favourite hilarious TV program or watch a favourite funny movie. Sometimes laughter is just what we need to stop wanting to eat everything in sight.
  • Take a walk. If you've had dinner, and still feel you'd like more, put on your sneakers and go for a walk. Getting out of the house and into the world can help snap you out of your thoughts of food.
  • Do something mindless. Knitting can be calming for many people. Other suggestions include jigsaw puzzles, Sudoku, word games, and other games. Find something mindless and calming and do it - without eating at the same time!
  • Get lost in your favourite book. Immersing yourself in a book is a great way to escape reality for a while. Find a bestseller or a series and allow yourself to get lost in the characters and the plot. Soon those brownies will no longer be calling your name.
  • Yoga is an amazing tool to get you out of your head and into your body. It's the exact opposite of out-of-control eating, which is spending far too much time in your head and not in your body. Try a yoga class and see how deep yoga breathing can transform your life.
  • Put on your favourite music and belt it out! A great way to elevate your mood is to blast your favourite songs and sing your heart out. If this would be frowned upon at your house, take a drive with your music.
  • Clean. This may not be your favourite activity, but it will distract you from wanting to eat. Plus you'll feel good that you've been productive and can cross stuff off your to do list.
  • Call (or FaceTime or Skype) a friend. Is there someone you've been meaning to catch up with? Now is a great time to do it, and they'll be glad to hear from you.
  • Go to a store or somewhere where there are people around. Being out and about in the world gets you out of yourself. It forces you to focus on what's going on around you and on all the other things there are in the world beside those chips beckoning to you at home.

 

If all else fails...

Here are some suggestions for eating better mindlessly!


One factor is the food you choose; a second is portion size. Let's focus on portion size for now. Beware of food that comes in large packages - it seems to imply that eating more is appropriate, typical and normal. Using larger plates and bowls also results in larger portion sizes. And most of us have a tendency to clean our plates. Further, most people are unwilling to admit or acknowledge that these factors actually influence them, but there's plenty of evidence that they do.

This tells us that there are a number of things we can do before we eat that will result in eating better even if we are not overly mindful when we're eating. This includes making a conscious (mindful) effort to:

  • reduce serving sizes and consumption by using smaller plates and bowls
  • use smaller packages or break large packages into sub-packages
  • replace short wide glasses with tall narrow ones
  • use smaller spoons when serving yourself or when eating from a bowl
  • eliminate the cookie jar or replace it with a fruit bowl
  • wrap tempting foods in foil to make them less visible and more forgettable
  • place healthier, low-density foods in the front of the refrigerator and the less healthy foods in the back
  • repackage food into smaller containers to suggest smaller portion sizes
  • put smaller dinner portions on (smaller) plates in advance, i.e. serve 'restaurant style' rather than putting large bowls or platters of food on the table so people can help themselves
  • never eat from a package - always put food on a plate or in a bowl to make portion estimation easier
  • reduce the visibility of stored foods by moving them to a cupboard or the basement immediately after they're purchased
  • reduce the convenience of stockpiled foods by boxing them up or freezing them
  • have lots of healthy, low energy density foods to stimulate their consumption and to leave less room for their high density counterparts

I hope these tips make it easier for you to eat mindfully, or at least better. You may be interested in the Nature's Sunshine IN.FORM program that is designed to help people not just burn fat, but be fit for life. The program is designed to help you make permanent changes in your life - it's not a 'quick fix' that leaves you to return to your old habits after you've completed it. If you would like more information about this, I can put you in touch with an IN.FORM coach in your area so you can consider signing up for the program.

 

For additional information, please email ramila@ramilas.com or call Ramilas Healing Arts Clinic at 613.829.0427 for an appointment. Please continue letting friends and family know about this newsletter. Also, on our website, see back issues of this newsletter, additional information about products, order products, and see information about our Clinic.

References:

  1. ©The Center for Mindful Eating Free to reproduce and distribute for educational purposes only.  In: IN.FORM Participant Manual. Nature's Sunshine Products of Canada Ltd, 2014, p. 144.
  2. Chozen Bays J. Mindful eating. psychologytoday.com/blog/mindful-eating/200902/mindful-eating  Accessed September 16, 2015.
  3. Albers S. 7 Mindful eating tips. ©National Eating Disorders Association. nationaleatingdisorders.org  Accessed September 16, 2015.
  4. 10 things to do instead of mindless eating. huffingtonpost.com/jenn-hand/10-things-to-do-instead-o_b_7235564.html  Accessed September 16, 2015.
  5. Wansink B. From mindless eating to mindlessly eating better. Physiology & Behavior 2010;100:454-463.

Disclaimer: The suggestions and recommendations in this newsletter are not intended to be prescriptive or diagnostic. The information is accurate and up to date to our knowledge, but we are not responsible for any errors in our sources of information.

 

Featured Service

Shiatsu Massage

A healing and diagnostic method that originated in Japan, it has become a popular and respected therapeutic technique in the Western world, now used in many major medical centres in combination with traditional methods. Click here find out more.

I'm so glad I discovered the special talents of Ramila. It's amazing how she can study your eye and know what's going on in your body. She has helped me tremendously in my health level. It's only been a few months, but I feel I have better control over my body. My energy is up, my stress level is down, and my immune system is working better.

- Jan F

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When health begins, dis-ease ends.

 

Making Healthy Choices - December 2009 - Volume 1 Issue 9

With the holiday season fast approaching this is a time of year that we are all busier than usual. In spite of the good times, we need to take care to stay rested, calm and well nourished, but not over-nourished with all the temptations that are everywhere! I have put together some practical tips for beating the most common ill effects of the holidays. I hope you find them helpful.
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